Legit Librarian Hacks

December 20, 2020

5-Finger Reading Rule

by Nathalie Jones

If you have a child in your household that can’t wait to get their hands on books, especially with all the extra time at home right now, check out the 5 Finger Reading Rule! It’s a suggested guide for early readers to build up their reading comprehension (i.e. how well they understand the words that they are reading).

Here’s how it works:

Open up a page of a book you want to read. Using the fingers on one of your hands, count out how many words you don’t recognize.

  • 0-1 words: the book might be too easy.
  • 1-2 words: this looks like a perfect fit!
  • 3-4 words: give this book a try, but swap to something else if you aren’t feeling comfortable.
  • 5+ words: this book is likely too challenging. This might be a great book to read with someone else or try later after building confidence with other stories.

While the 5 Finger Reading Rule is a fun tool, remember that the goal is to promote a love for lifelong learning, and interest and ability levels do not necessarily matchup. Interest level means what the reader wants to read, whereas ability level means how much of the story the reader understands. For example, does your early reader love to learn about all things historical? Their interest level may take them to explore old and new worlds like in History! : The Past as You’ve Never Seen It Before from the Smithsonian Institution, while their ability level may take them to learn about the life of Josephine Baker by Ma Isabel Sánchez Vegara; illustrated by Agathe Sorlet.

Question: What should I do if my child is reading on their own but is struggling with the books they have chosen?

  • Encourage them to ask you or someone they trust what unfamiliar words mean. Sometimes it can feel daunting to acknowledge when we don’t know something, so trust is very important for your child.
  • Help them look up the definition of words they don’t know. We have dictionaries available at the library or you can find many helpful resources online. Not only will this help with their reading comprehension, it will help with their vocabulary skills as well! Did you know that according to Early Childhood Literacy Consultant and author, Saroj Ghoting, “[c]hildren’s books have about 31 rare words per thousand words. That’s 3 times more than in conversation and 25% more rare words than what is on television programs.”
  • Encourage them to use the 5 Finger Reading Rule to find a book that they feel both challenged and confident with.
  • Use our library catalogue to discover books within your child’s reading level. See below for a guide!
  • Check out a list of our juvenile starter books here.
  • Still need more help finding something within your child’s interest and ability level? Ask us!

 

Searching by reading level through the library catalogue:

  1. Search for a book your reader already loves in our library catalogue.
  2. Click on the title of the book, which will lead you to the book’s record.
  3. Scroll to the bottom of the page until you find the Reading Level
  4. Select the Browse by Reading Level
  5. Use the Lexile Measure, Accelerated Reader, and Age/Grade Level tabs to search by your reader’s ability level on the sliding scale.

Effective and Safe Online Searching

by Patrick Siebold

Most of us don’t think twice about pulling out our devices to ‘Google’ a recipe or find a book review. Indeed, we have come to rely on our devices and the internet to be able to find information instantly. In this age of disinformation and misinformation, it is remarkable that more emphasis has not been placed on doing this effectively and safely.

Most of us, myself included, don’t pay much attention to how and where we search for something online. We often just use the easiest default search engine on whatever device or computer we are using, but it is important to remember that not all search engines are created equally. Most search engines store a history of your online activity and will give you personalized or filtered search results based on what the search engine thinks you want. This means that two people sitting right next to each other might get completely different search results for the exact same search. While this might actually help shorten your search time if you are looking for a pair of jeans on Amazon, what if you are searching for news or current events? Or doing research for a course? Or looking for legal or medical information?

To get around this it is good practice to try multiple search engines and compare the results. Or better yet, there are some search engines out there, like DuckDuckGo, that emphasizes protecting searchers’ privacy and avoiding the filter bubble of personalized search results. Most importantly, they show all users the same search results for a given search term.

Also, while search engines are a great source of instant information, think movie reviews, if you are doing any kind of research, and by this, I loosely mean anything from looking for new dishwasher ratings to researching the Long term effects of soluble endoglin and mild hypercholesterolemia in mice hearts and everything in between, it is far better to search somewhere with results you can trust, like in a library’s subscription database! As one of my instructors once drilled into me, Google is a great place to start a search, but not a great place to end a search (more on this next time!).

Note: If you happen to be shopping around for a new dishwasher or have an interest in mice hearts I have provided links to articles in two of our very excellent subscription databases: Consumer Reports and Academic Search Elite (Library Number Required).

 

Effective and Safe Online Searching- Part Two 

by Patrick Siebold

I think most of us acknowledge that the internet can sometimes feel like a wilderness. There is no question that there is a ton of great information out there; YouTube instructional videos alone have empowered millions of us to try and fix our own broken appliances, usually voiding their warranties in the process. But there are dangers lurking out there in the corners of the internet. In the early days of the internet, the dangers seemed a lot less dire. Sure you might get spammed and the endless pop-ups were irritating but a quick reboot or disk defrag usually did the trick. These days the consequences seem direr, probably because we have become so dependent on it. The internet isn’t just a place for novelty entertainment, it is how we connect with our friends and family, where we do our banking, work, shop, collect government assistance and much more. Indeed, the UN has even declared that our online freedom is a basic Human Right.

But, as it has grown to be an essential component of our everyday lives, the risks have also proportionally increased. Like something out of a dystopian cold war alternate history novel, hackers have evolved from misunderstood teenagers breaking into things for the fun of it to sophisticated teams of state-sponsored ‘foreign actors’ (usually Russians) meddling in things like elections and stock exchanges. The most troubling part of this is that they are doing these things by manipulating us. The spread of disinformation via thousands of false social media accounts with nefarious links which are then shared again and again and again is well documented. And evidence has shown that this happens all throughout the political spectrum so no one is immune.

So how do we know what is real and true?  Surely there has to be an easy way to determine the veracity, or authenticity, of a website or online source? Well, unfortunately, there isn’t an easy way to do this.

The best tool is you. Thinking critically. Look at everything with a critical eye. Be a detective. One technique for doing this is called, somewhat cheekily, the CRAAP test.

CRAAP stands for Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy, and Purpose. The CRAAP Test was developed by Sarah Blakeslee and her team of librarians at California State University and is used to instruct students how to do research, but I would argue that this is useful for everyone who uses the internet:

  1. Currency: Is the information up-to-date?
  2. Relevance: Is the information relevant and of a level appropriate for your research?
  3. Authority: Where is the information published and who is the author?
  4. Accuracy: Where does the information come from? Is it supported by evidence?
  5. Purpose: Why was this information published? What was the motive?

Also, there are some specific things to look for when opening a website, particularly the URL (universal resource locator). This is what appears right after the www. and it tells you the name of the organization or host of the site (e.g. virl.bc.ca). The domain (usually one of the last parts of the main URL) tells you the nature of the organization (.com, .gov, .edu, .org etc.). It is important to be aware of who is providing the information, for example, information on research into smoking and lung cancer might be more reliable if it comes from an .edu site than if it is a .com site related to the tobacco industry or a .org site from an anti-tobacco group. Finally, the last letters represent the country.

A strangely long and complicated URL is sometimes a clue that a website may not be what it seems.

One good rule to go by is that if you suspect something is fishy, it probably is.

If you want to take it a step further and really give yourself some tangible tools to navigate a world awash in fake news and misinformation, Carl T. Bergstrom and Jevin West at the University of Washington have developed a free online course to this effect, entitled Calling Bullshit: Data Reasoning in a Digital World. This site has a variety of fun, interactive and informative resources that are also great for impressing your family and friends with.

Good Luck! And for Pete Sakes, don’t open that email if you don’t recognize the source!